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Addiction Education: Top 5 things to know about Meth

Man Dealing with Meth

Addiction Education: Top 5 things to know about Meth

July 1, 2016
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This post is more or less meant for the families and friends of those whom are suspected of being under the influence of harmful substances. In order to solve the problem, we need to know what the problem is. Although we may know what drug someone is addicted to, we may not always be aware of the nuances regarding that certain drug. It may help to hear some general information that not everyone knows about.

How it Works

Meth is a stimulant drug that can be snorted, injected, smoked, taken orally, or dissolved in a liquid to drink. It launches a huge amount of neurotransmitter dopamine into the brain, which creates a euphoric blast of a sense of reward or pleasure. It increases motor function and increases a person’s sense of wakefulness. Although not always on the first try, repeated use of methamphetamines can quickly lead to addiction due to the body’s dependence.

How we treat it

Behavioral Therapy is currently the best use of recovering from Meth addiction. It is a focus of reworking a person’s desires to be based more on positive habits rather than negative. This often involves a 12-step process over the course of four months. During the program, the patient is mentally counseled on what they find pleasurable and their mental and physical needs. There are currently no medicinal treatments for Meth Addiction. Because of this, the recovery process has to come from both the environmental and the personal support around the person.

Short term Symptoms

A Euphoric feeling
Increased Respiration
Increase in Attention
Decrease in Fatigue
Irregular Heartbeat
Less Appetite
Anxiety
Increased Energy
Hyperthermia
Convulsions
Increased Blood Pressure
Increased Heart-rate
Cardiovascular collapse
Irritability
Insomnia
Confusion
Paranoia

Long term Symptoms

Violent and Aggressive behavior
Psychotic Behavior
Mood Swings
Stroke
Tooth Rot
Malnutrition
Dehydration
Auditory Hallucinations
Delusions
Thoughts of Homicide or Suicide
Brain damage similar to Epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s disease
Confusion

Withdrawal Symptoms

Sleep Disturbances
Fevers
Hyperventilation
Energy Loss
Nausea
Shaking
Palpitations
Coma
Chills
Fearfulness and Paranoia
Depression
Sweating
Irritability
Respiratory Failure